Harmony Through Melody

Harmony Through Melody

The Interaction of Melody, Counterpoint, and Harmony in Western Music

Charles Horton, David A. Byrne, Lawrence Ritchey

$85.50

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Description

Harmony Through Melody:The Interaction of Melody, Counterpoint, and Harmony in Western Music, Second Edition offers a robust, composition-based approach to tonal music theory, ranging from early modality to recent film and popular music. Charles Horton, David A. Byrne, and Lawrence Ritchey develop techniques and strategies for exploring the fundamental interaction of melody and counterpoint with harmony, and provide students with opportunities to creatively express what they have learned in the writing and analysis of short passages and complete pieces in historical styles.

This second edition contains additional examples from the standard literature, film music, and popular song, and features new assignments involving late nineteenth-century chromatic practice. The textbook present a step-by-step method for the composition and analysis of short passages and complete pieces, with more than 1400 musical examples drawn from a variety of styles and genres, plus classroom-tested examples for study and suggested assignments at the end of each chapter.

The second edition has an online companion website (textbooks.rowman.com/horton2e) featuring:

  • A student workbook with more than 260 assignments for individual work and classroom use
  • Audio links to 315 newly-recorded live performances of model compositions and fully realized settings

An instructor’s manual with guidelines for evaluation of assignments, additional repertoire for in-class analysis and assignments, sample syllabi, and other useful information is also available. Please email textbooks@rowman.com for more information.


Author

Charles Horton:
Charles Horton is Associate Dean of the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where as Associate Professor of Music (now retired) he taught music theory, music history, counterpoint, analysis, chamber music and piano. He has appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe in solo recitals, chamber music concerts and concerto performances; his teachers have included Alexandra Pierce, Marvin Blickenstaff, Jeanneane Dowis and Jerome Lowenthal. He is the founding music director (1997) of All The King's Men, Winnipeg's male-voice liturgical choir; the choir has undertaken six English cathedral tours, most recently for residencies at Worcester and Exeter Cathedrals. He is a founding member of the Society for Music Theory and a former co-editor of In Theory Only.

David A. Byrne
is Assistant Professor of Music Theory in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where he teaches music theory and orchestration. He earned a Ph.D. in music theory from the University of Cincinnati, with a dissertation on the harmonic theories of Sigfrid Karg-Elert. His research encompasses the history of theory in the early twentieth century, transformational models of chromatic harmony, and the analysis of symphonic form. His work is published in Music Research Forum, and he has presented at many conferences including the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Analysis, and the International Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music. In addition to his teaching and research in music theory, he is a clarinetist, conductor and arranger.

Lawrence Ritchey (1939 – 2006) was Associate Professor of Music in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba and a Senior Fellow at St. John's College; he taught music theory, jazz history, organ, and harpsichord. He appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe; his frequent performances included solo recitals, concerto performances, continuo playing and collaborations with singers in performances of American popular song and jazz. He teachers included Arthur Poister and Marcel Dupré. He served as chair of the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal, Mosaic, and was organist and choirmaster of St. John's Anglican Cathedral in Winnipeg.

|||Charles Horton is Associate Dean of the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where as Associate Professor of Music (now retired) he taught music theory, music history, counterpoint, analysis, chamber music and piano. He has appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe in solo recitals, chamber music concerts and concerto performances; his teachers have included Alexandra Pierce, Marvin Blickenstaff, Jeanneane Dowis and Jerome Lowenthal. He is the founding music director (1997) of All The King's Men, Winnipeg's male-voice liturgical choir; the choir has undertaken six English cathedral tours, most recently for residencies at Worcester and Exeter Cathedrals. He is a founding member of the Society for Music Theory and a former co-editor of In Theory Only.

David A. Byrne
is Assistant Professor of Music Theory in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where he teaches music theory and orchestration. He earned a Ph.D. in music theory from the University of Cincinnati, with a dissertation on the harmonic theories of Sigfrid Karg-Elert. His research encompasses the history of theory in the early twentieth century, transformational models of chromatic harmony, and the analysis of symphonic form. His work is published in Music Research Forum, and he has presented at many conferences including the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Analysis, and the International Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music. In addition to his teaching and research in music theory, he is a clarinetist, conductor and arranger.

Lawrence Ritchey (1939 – 2006) was Associate Professor of Music in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba and a Senior Fellow at St. John's College; he taught music theory, jazz history, organ, and harpsichord. He appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe; his frequent performances included solo recitals, concerto performances, continuo playing and collaborations with singers in performances of American popular song and jazz. He teachers included Arthur Poister and Marcel Dupré. He served as chair of the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal, Mosaic, and was organist and choirmaster of St. John's Anglican Cathedral in Winnipeg.

|||Charles Horton is Associate Dean of the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where as Associate Professor of Music (now retired) he taught music theory, music history, counterpoint, analysis, chamber music and piano. He has appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe in solo recitals, chamber music concerts and concerto performances; his teachers have included Alexandra Pierce, Marvin Blickenstaff, Jeanneane Dowis and Jerome Lowenthal. He is the founding music director (1997) of All The King's Men, Winnipeg's male-voice liturgical choir; the choir has undertaken six English cathedral tours, most recently for residencies at Worcester and Exeter Cathedrals. He is a founding member of the Society for Music Theory and a former co-editor of In Theory Only.

David A. Byrne
is Assistant Professor of Music Theory in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba, where he teaches music theory and orchestration. He earned a Ph.D. in music theory from the University of Cincinnati, with a dissertation on the harmonic theories of Sigfrid Karg-Elert. His research encompasses the history of theory in the early twentieth century, transformational models of chromatic harmony, and the analysis of symphonic form. His work is published in Music Research Forum, and he has presented at many conferences including the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Analysis, and the International Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music. In addition to his teaching and research in music theory, he is a clarinetist, conductor and arranger.

Lawrence Ritchey (1939 – 2006) was Associate Professor of Music in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba and a Senior Fellow at St. John's College; he taught music theory, jazz history, organ, and harpsichord. He appeared in concert in Canada, the United States and Europe; his frequent performances included solo recitals, concerto performances, continuo playing and collaborations with singers in performances of American popular song and jazz. He teachers included Arthur Poister and Marcel Dupré. He served as chair of the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal, Mosaic, and was organist and choirmaster of St. John's Anglican Cathedral in Winnipeg.

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